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, one of the nation's most important writers on economic issues, corrects the record on economist John Maynard Keyens and also makes the effort not to allow Obama false use of the Great Depression as a tool to influence the nation. First of Kenyens: Keynes argued that, when businesses and people cannot or will not invest, then the government must take on the role of filling the gap. The key is speed. The means, Keynes wrote in The General Theory of Employment cheapest cialis, Interest and Money, really did not matter so much: If the Treasury were to fill old bottles with bank notes, bury them at suitable depths in disused coal mines which are then cheapest cialis filled to the surface with town rubbish and leave it to private enterprise on well-tried principles of laissez-faire to dig the notes up again, . . . there need be no more unemployment and with the help of the repercussions, the real income of the community would probably become a good deal larger than it is. Of course, Keynes favored large public-works projects over the burying of bottles. Building roads in the right places, for example, would both put people to work and provide the basis for more commerce. At first, Keynes emphasized government spending as stimulus, but, when pressed in 1933, he advocated tax cuts as well—specifically in response to criticism that public-works projects do not put cash into the system quickly enough. So, it is improper to mention Kenyes without mentioniong tax cuts, which Obama used last night to indicate it was the sole philosophy of President Bush. Indeed Obama mentioned "the last eight years" several times in his press conference last night. Cheapest cialis by the obama standard, his stimulus efforts have little that is dissimilar to pork spending that bush signed, except that he refers them to "shovel ready" or "puts people to work. " To be fair, Obama did say last night that there were some things in the package that do not offer the sort of stimuklus he had in mind. It remains to be seen, however, whether or not he match his clout with his words. Thus far, Obama has talked the talk of moderation and thoughtfulness yet has delivered nothing besides that which placates his leftist allies. Now about the Great Depression of which its clear that no one seems to agree on, Glassman says this: Not only was the stimulative effect of Great Depression fiscal policy non-existent, but follow-on efforts [cheapest cialis] during the ten subsequent recessions proved equally ineffective. As a result of that hard-won experience, the consensus until recently among economists was that attempts at stimulus through emergency fiscal policies—as opposed to monetary policies and the automatic effects of increases in unemployment assistance and decreases in tax payments—were useless at best. Typical was the statement of Martin Eichenbaum of Northwestern University in the American Economic Review in 1997: “There is now widespread agreement that countercyclical discretionary fiscal policy is neither desirable nor politically feasible. ” Martin Feldstein, then president of the National Bureau of Economic Research, agreed. Fiscal stimulus, he said in 2002, “has not contributed to economic stability and may have actually been destabilizing. ” The new president speaks and communicates well, but seemed to falter a bit last night when speaking about the economy, his answers often halting and focused on platitudes. He actually handled foreign policy better. At any rate, he will be called upon for his inaccuracies and held accountable for his moderate tones. Sadly, he's not actually demonstarted the later with anything except words.


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